In 2011, Tawakkol Karman became the first Yemeni, the first Arab woman, the second Muslim and, at 32 years-old, the youngest person to ever win the Nobel Peace Prize. The trailblazer became the face and voice of the Yemeni uprising.  She’s featured, along with 10 other inspiring women, in Al-Monitor’s slideshow of Mideast Trailblazers for International Women’s Day.

In 2011, Tawakkol Karman became the first Yemeni, the first Arab woman, the second Muslim and, at 32 years-old, the youngest person to ever win the Nobel Peace Prize. The trailblazer became the face and voice of the Yemeni uprising.  She’s featured, along with 10 other inspiring women, in Al-Monitor’s slideshow of Mideast Trailblazers for International Women’s Day.

Via sheikhamozahfashion, a tumblr exclusively devoted to the fashion sense of Sheikha Moza bint Nasser — one of the Middle East’s most powerful women. She’s featured on Al-Monitor's Mideast Trailblazers slideshow in honor of International Women’s Day.

Get going. Enter the sphere of technology. Go and study — and rather than law studies, opt for math and physics.
Maxine Fassberg, Intel’s general manager in Israel, giving her advice for girls who aspire to someday be CEO of Intel.
Read her full interview with Al-Monitor contributor Tali Heruti-Sover, where she discusses her struggles in Israel’s male-dominated high-tech industry — where she says “equal opportunities [are needed] for men and women alike to enter the industry and move on side by side.”
I’m not optimistic about women in Shura. The current members don’t represent us and I don’t expect them to serve our causes.
Hessa al-Asmari, an editor of a local news website in southern Saudi Arabia, discussingSaudi’s decision this month to appoint 30 women to its Shura Council. Read more on the move — and on why some women are disappointed in it — at Al-Monitor.
Trend Map: Mixed Boxing, Women’s Rights and The History of Music

Street performers in Marrakech’s medina have taken the show to a whole new level. Forget snake-charmers and dancing Gnawa kids, this boxer takes on a female Belgian tourist.

 

This trending video in Iran is a seven-minute animation of the history of music. It may be popular in the Mideast, but it’s a history of western music.


And Saudi women continue the fight. In this cartoon, a woman steps over Teacher’s Issues, Unemployment, Rights of Divorcees, Domestic Violence Issues and Driving a Car before she heads to the Shura Council. (Note: Driving a Car is last)

Meanwhile, a Saudi man on Twitter Dr. Salman Alodah has gained over 2 million followers. After advocating violent jihad in the 1990s, the sheikh was thrown in prison for five years for extremist activities. When he got out, according to Saudi blogger Saudiwoman, “His whole ideology took a 180 degree turn… The real shocker is that his wife was wearing a niqab and her abaya was on her shoulders and NOT tent style over her head!

Plus, check out our Pulse Map, which shows what videos, images and links are going viral in the Middle East right now. It tracks what’s trending on Twitter via TrendsMap, a company that tracks Twitter Trends around the world in real-time.

Women were shoulder-to-shoulder with men in the revolutions.
Melanne Verveer, US envoy for global women’s issues, talking about the central role of women in overthrowing dictatorships during the Arab Spring. Women are now prime targets of radical Islamists attempting to hijack the movement, she said in an interview with Al-Monitor’s Sophie Claudet.
Some Iraqi politicians will boycott meetings of parliament to protest the exclusion of women on Iraq’s election authority body, reports Omar Sattar in one of our Arab media partners,Al-Hayat. Safiya Suheil, an independent member of parliament, toldAl-Hayat:

Women are being marginalized to a large extent in the Iraqi political life, in general, and in all the legislative, executive and judicial institutions, in particular….We demand that women be allocated a seat in the IHEC and other institutions, and that is in accordance with the legal quota for female participation in parliament, which is at least 25%.

Some Iraqi politicians will boycott meetings of parliament to protest the exclusion of women on Iraq’s election authority body, reports Omar Sattar in one of our Arab media partners,Al-Hayat. Safiya Suheil, an independent member of parliament, toldAl-Hayat:

Women are being marginalized to a large extent in the Iraqi political life, in general, and in all the legislative, executive and judicial institutions, in particular….We demand that women be allocated a seat in the IHEC and other institutions, and that is in accordance with the legal quota for female participation in parliament, which is at least 25%.

The Iranian national women’s football team was barred from playing an Olympic qualifier against Jordan for wearing the traditional Islamic headscarf just moments before the game was scheduled to start last year. But FIFA lifted the ban last week. (Photo: AFP PHOTO/STR)

The Iranian national women’s football team was barred from playing an Olympic qualifier against Jordan for wearing the traditional Islamic headscarf just moments before the game was scheduled to start last year. But FIFA lifted the ban last week. (Photo: AFP PHOTO/STR)