Presidential candidate Hassan Rouhani’s 30-minute documentary on state TV has captured voters’ attention just days before the election. For the most part, though, there are reports of apathy and disillusionment among voters. For more election coverage, check out Iran Pulse.

Female Palestinian militants from the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine (DFLP) are pictured through a sheet of fabric as they take part in a training session in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on June 10, 2013.
(Photo: REUTERS/Suhaib Salem)

Female Palestinian militants from the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine (DFLP) are pictured through a sheet of fabric as they take part in a training session in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on June 10, 2013.

(Photo: REUTERS/Suhaib Salem)

In an exclusive report from Qusair, Ali Hashem describes the underground network in this strategic city, which borders with Lebanon. In each city, town and village, dozens of hideouts and underground routes have been found by the Syrian army and Hezbollah fighters.

The Beirut Art Center has remodeled its space into old living rooms, complete with vintage television sets and furniture for its current exhibit, Video Vintage 1963-1983, which shows the work of over 52 artists selected from Centre Pompidou′s New Media Collection.

Seti Bigjani started the Annette Gallery in Tehran in 1961, growing it from a small space where he showed his own work to being commisioned to renovate the Qajar-era paintings on the ceiling of the Niavaran Palace. His family continues to run the gallery..

Seti Bigjani started the Annette Gallery in Tehran in 1961, growing it from a small space where he showed his own work to being commisioned to renovate the Qajar-era paintings on the ceiling of the Niavaran Palace. His family continues to run the gallery.
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Amit, an Israeli cowboy, tends cattle on a ranch just outside Moshav Yonatan, a collective farming community some two kilometers south of the ceasefire line between Israel and Syria in the Golan Heights. Cowboys, who have been running the ranch on the Golan’s volcanic rocky plateau for some 35 years, also host the Israeli military, who use half of the cattle farm as a live-fire training zone.
(Photo: REUTERS/Nir Elias)

Amit, an Israeli cowboy, tends cattle on a ranch just outside Moshav Yonatan, a collective farming community some two kilometers south of the ceasefire line between Israel and Syria in the Golan Heights. Cowboys, who have been running the ranch on the Golan’s volcanic rocky plateau for some 35 years, also host the Israeli military, who use half of the cattle farm as a live-fire training zone.

(Photo: REUTERS/Nir Elias)

Writing at Al-Monitor, Dalia Hatuqa reviews the graphic novel about Budrus, a small West Bank village that waging a non-violent protest against Israel’s separation wall. The graphic novel is based on Julia Bacha’s award-winning documentary (see the trailer).

Writing at Al-Monitor, Dalia Hatuqa reviews the graphic novel about Budrus, a small West Bank village that waging a non-violent protest against Israel’s separation wall. The graphic novel is based on Julia Bacha’s award-winning documentary (see the trailer).

In Al-Monitor’s weekly round-up of news out of the Middle East,

  • The US and Israel escalate the war in Syria as parties debate the “red line” for chemical weapons use;
  • news from Russia, Iran, Hezbollah and Khaled Meshaal;
  • Al-Monitor launches Iran Pulse, expanding our coverage and reporting in and about Iran.
In today’s Al-Monitor photo of the day, a group exhibit at Opera Gallery in London called “Peace From the Bottom of My Art” features the work of major Iranian artists from Parviz Tanavoli to Koorosh Shishegaran. Above is a painting by Shirazi artist Afarin Sajedi. Meanwhile, visit Al-Monitor’s new Iran Pulse.

In today’s Al-Monitor photo of the day, a group exhibit at Opera Gallery in London called “Peace From the Bottom of My Art” features the work of major Iranian artists from Parviz Tanavoli to Koorosh Shishegaran. Above is a painting by Shirazi artist Afarin Sajedi. Meanwhile, visit Al-Monitor’s new Iran Pulse.

Israel has nothing to fear. Israel is a country in full bloom… The only threat to Israel is demography, the fear that Israel will find itself in 10 or 20 years from now as a country of all its citizens, with a non-Jewish majority, and then it will be too late to regain its footing.
Daniel Abraham, founder of the Center for Middle East Peace, speaking to Al-Monitor’s Ben Caspit. Abraham told Caspit that without an agreement with the Palestinians, Israel will find itself with a non-Jewish majority:
“You have to get rid of the Palestinian issue,” he emphasized. “It’s like something in your stomach that causes an ulcer, it’s an ulcer, a wound that won’t disappear, won’t heal. It simply needs to be removed. You don’t understand what could be here if you resolve this problem, if you establish a state with a solid Jewish majority, the sky would be the limit.”

Algeria’s bakers are demanding that the government raise bread prices in the country as they struggle to turn a profit, writes Kaci Racelma for Al-Monitor. Last week the National Commission for Bakers called for a one-day strike.
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad may become the first former president under Ayatollah Khamenei to spend part of his retirement under house arrest, writes Meir Javendanfar in Al-Monitor:

Ahmadinejad has two options: to defend himself now, with all his might, to try to deter his rivals from attacking him after he leaves office or to hold his fire until after he steps down. Both options have advantages and disadvantages.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad may become the first former president under Ayatollah Khamenei to spend part of his retirement under house arrest, writes Meir Javendanfar in Al-Monitor:

Ahmadinejad has two options: to defend himself now, with all his might, to try to deter his rivals from attacking him after he leaves office or to hold his fire until after he steps down. Both options have advantages and disadvantages.

In today’s Al-Monitor photo of the day, Mohammed Mahmoud Street near Tahrir Square has been a renewable canvas since Egypt’s 2011 revolution. As clashes continue there, a woman walked passed the graffiti denouncing the Interior Ministry and members of the Muslim Brotherhood on April 29, 2013. (photo by Reuters)

In today’s Al-Monitor photo of the day, Mohammed Mahmoud Street near Tahrir Square has been a renewable canvas since Egypt’s 2011 revolution. As clashes continue there, a woman walked passed the graffiti denouncing the Interior Ministry and members of the Muslim Brotherhood on April 29, 2013. (photo by Reuters)